Recovery Tips

  • Complete an activity diary in order to identify your triggers.
  • PACE – start low and go slow. Balance activity with rest.
  • After an activity; aim to re-charge the area that has been exerted. Limit rest breaks and daytime naps to no more than 30 minutes. Avoid under-exertion.
  • Escape the BOOM BUST Cycle. Reduce your triggers and avoid any over-exertion.
  • Aim to minimise PEM where possible.
  • To begin with, aim to stay at 55% of your maximum heart rate (220 – your age x 0.55).
  • Find your baseline and ensure a period of consistency before attempting to increase your activity levels.
  • PLAN – spread out your activities throughout the week; and alternate between different types of exertion. Remember to schedule in rest breaks.
  •  PRIORITISE – Get rid of anything unnecessary and ask for help. Try to balance enjoyable tasks with not so enjoyable tasks and make time for what is important and
    enjoyable to you.
  • Aim to conserve energy where possible.
  • Optimise Sleep, Diet and Mental Health. Stay connected and seek help and support where necessary.
  • Expect stumbling blocks and setbacks. Fatigue is fluctuating in nature and recovery will therefore be trial and error. Remember to PACE even on the good days.
  • Manage the factors you can do something about. Remember – small gains add up to improvement (even 1%).
  • Aim to keep activity levels stable for at least 7 days. Once the foundations are in place you can then move into the building phase.
  • Aim to resume your normal daily routine by making small, gradual changes. Increase activity levels by no more than 20% per week. Do not rush your recovery or try to push through your fatigue.
  • Set yourself SMART goals (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and timely). These can be short or long term goals. What do you want to achieve?
  • Record and reward your achievements and progress.

Remember:
Recovery varies from person to person and it can take time.
It is important to focus on how far you have come; not on who you were pre-Covid.

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